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College Composition and Communication, Vol. 58, No. 1, September 2006

Click here to view the individual articles in this issue at http://www.ncte.org/cccc/ccc/issues/v58-1

Eldred, Janet. “Review Essay: To Code or Not to Code, or, If I Can’t Program a Computer, Why Am I Teaching Writing?”  Rev. of Electronic Collaboration in the Humanities , James A. Inman, Cheryl Reed, and Peter Sands, eds.; Multiliteracies for a Digital Age by Stuart A. Selber; Writing New Media: Theory and Applications for Expanding the Teaching of Composition by Anne Frances Wysocki, Johndan Johnson-Eilola, Cynthia L. Selfe, and Geoffrey Sirc. CCC 58.1 (2006): 119-125.

Durst, Russel K. and William H. Thelin. “Interchanges: Commenting on William Thelin’s ‘Understanding Problems in Critical Classrooms’ Can We Be Critical of Critical Pedagogy.” CCC 58.1 (2006): 110-118.

Valentine, Kathryn. “Plagiarism as Literacy Practice: Recognizing and Rethinking Ethical Binaries.” CCC 58.1 (2006): 89-109.

Abstract:

In this article, I assert that plagiarism is a literacy practice that involves social relationships, attitudes, and values as much as it involves rules of citation and students’ texts. In addition, I show how plagiarism is complicated by a discourse about academic dishonesty, and I consider the implications that recognizing such complexity has for teaching.

Keywords:

ccc58.1 Plagiarism Students Work Identity Citation Discourse Literacy Professor Honesty Pedagogy Morality Practices

Works Cited

Barton, David, and Mary Hamilton. Local Literacies: Reading and Writing in One Community . London: Routledge, 1998.
Bauman, Zygmunt. Life in Fragments: Essays in Postmodern Morality. Oxford: Blackwell, 1995.
Brodkey, Linda. Writing Permitted in Designated Areas Only. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1996.
Buranen, Lise. “But I Wasn’t Cheating.” Buranen and Roy 63-74.
Buranen, Lise, and Alice M. Roy, eds. Perspectives on Plagiarism and Intellectual Property in a Postmodern World . Albany, New York: State University of New York P, 1999.
Butler, Judith. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. 1990. New York: Routledge, 1999.
Fox, Helen. Listening to the World: Cultural Issues in Academic Writing. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1994.
Gee, James Paul. “The New Literacy Studies: From ‘Socially Situated’ to the Work of the Social.” Situated Literacies: Reading and Writing in Context . Eds. David Barton, Mary Hamilton, and Roz Ivanic. London: Routledge, 2000. 180- 196.
—. Social Linguistics and Literacies: Ideology in Discourses. 2nd ed. London: Taylor & Francis, 1996.
Grimm, Nancy Maloney. Good Intentions: Writing Center Work for Postmodern Times . Portsmouth, Boynton/Cook- Heinemann, 1999.
Howard, Rebecca Moore. “The Ethics of Plagiarism.” The Ethics of Writing Instruction: Issues in Theory and Practice . Ed. Michael A. Pemberton. Stamford, CT: Ablex, 2000. 79-89.
—. “Plagiarisms, Authorships, and the Academic Death Penalty.” College English 57 (1995): 788-806.
—. “Sexuality, Textuality: The Cultural Work of Plagiarism.” College English 62 (2000): 473-491.
McLeod, Susan H. “Responding to Plagiarism: The Role of the WPA.” Writing Program Administration 15.3 (1992): 7-16.
New London Group. “A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: Designing Social Futures.” Bill Cope and Mary Kalantzis, Eds. Multiliteracies: Literacy Learning and the Design of Social Futures . New York: Routledge, 2000. 9-37.
Price, Margaret. ” Beyond ‘Gotcha!’: Situating Plagiarism in Policy and Pedagogy .” CCC 54 (2002): 88-115.
Rose, Shirley K. “The Role of Scholarly Citations in Disciplinary Economies.” Buranen and Roy 241-249.
Roy, Alice M. “Whose Words These Are I Think I Know: Plagiarism, the Postmodern, and Faculty Attitudes.” Buranen and Roy 55-61.
Simmons, Sue Carter. “Competing Notions of Authorship: A Historical Look at Students and Textbooks on Plagiarism and Cheating.” Buranen and Roy 41-51.
Wells, Dorothy. “An Account of the Complex Causes of Unintentional Plagiarism in College Writing.” Writing Program Administration 16.3 (1993): 59-71.
Wilgoren, Jodi. “School Cheating Scandal Tests a Town’s Values.” New York Times. 14 Feb 2002: A1(L).

Schneider, Barbara. “Ethical Research and Pedagogical Gaps.” CCC 58.1 (2006): 70-88.

Abstract:

“Guidelines for the Ethical Treatment of Students and Student Writing in Composition Studies” signals our increased awareness of the ethical obligations that attend our scholarship and research. Our adoption of research methods from other fields, particularly the social sciences, has heightened that concern. We must now consider the ethical obligations we assume when we teach those methods to students at the beginning of their academic careers.

Keywords:

ccc58.1 Research Students Guidelines Ethics Writing Composition Field Methods Study ResearchEthics Inquiry Studies BelmontReport

Works Cited

Anderson, Paul V. ” Simple Gifts: Ethical Issues in the Conduct of Person-Based Composition Research .” CCC 49.1 (1998): 63-89.
Berlin, James. Rhetoric and Reality: Writing Instruction in American Colleges, 19001985. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1987.
Bishop, Wendy. Ethnographic Writing Research: Writing It Down, Writing It Up, and Reading It. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1999.
Brandt, Deborah. Literacy in American Lives. New York: Cambridge UP, 2001.
College Conference on Composition and Communication. “Guidelines for the Ethical Treatment of Students and Student Writing in Composition Studies.” CCC 52.3 (2001): 485-490.
Crowley, Sharon. Composition in the University: Historical and Polemical Essays. Pittsburgh: U of Pittsburgh P, 1998.
Cushman, Ellen. “The Rhetorician as an Agent of Social Change.” CCC 47.1 (1996): 7-28.
Durst, Russel K. “Promising Research: An Historical Analysis of Award-Winning Inquiry, 1970-1989.” Research in the Teaching of English. 26.1 (1992): 41-70.
Ede, Lisa. “Reading: and ReReading: the Braddock Essays.” On Writing Research: The Braddock Essays 19751998. Ed. Lisa Ede. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 1999. 1-27.
Faigley, Lester, and Jack Selzer. Good Reasons with Contemporary Arguments. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon, 2001.
Mortensen, Peter, and Gesa Kirsch, Eds. Ethics and Representation in Qualitative Studies of Literacy. Urbana: National Council of Teachers of English, 1996. National Institutes of Health. Human Participant Protections: Education for Research Teams. Rev. November 2002. http://cme.cancer.gov/c01 15 August 2004.
North, Stephen. The Making of Knowledge in Composition: Portrait of an Emerging Field. Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton/ Cook, 1987.
Royster, Jacqueline Jones. Traces of a Stream: Literacy and Social Change among African American Women . Pittsburgh Series in Composition, Literacy, and Culture. Ed. David Bartholomae, Jean Ferguson Carr. Pittsburgh: U of Pittsburgh P, 2000.
Trimbur, John. The Call to Write. Brf. 2nd ed. New York: Addison Wesley Longman, 2002.
United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare. National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. The Belmont Report. Washington: GPO, 20 September 2004. http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/guidance/belmont.htm.

Schneider, Stephen. “Freedom Schooling: Stokely Carmichael and Critical Rhetorical Education.” CCC 58.1 (2006): 46-69.

Abstract:

“Freedom Schooling” looks at a Freedom School class taught by Black Power activist Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture). Specifically, this article explores the philosophies of language and education that informed this class and the organic relationship fostered between the classroom and the political goals of African American communities during the civil rights era.

Keywords:

ccc58.1 SCarmichael Language Education Class Students Freedom Schools Community Pedagogy Power AAVE Practices AfricanAmerican BlackPower CivilRights

Works Cited

Burke, Kenneth. A Grammar of Motives. Berkeley: U of California P, 1969.
Carmichael, Stokely. Stokely Speaks: Black Power Back to Pan-Africanism. New York: Random House, 1971.
Carmichael, Stokely, and Ekwueme Michael Thelwell. Ready for Revolution: The Life and Struggles of Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture) . New York: Scribner, 2003.
Carson, Clayborne. In Struggle: SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960s. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1981.
(ed.). The Student Voice, 1960-1965: Periodical of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee . Westport: Meckler, 1990.
Fanon, Frantz. Black Skin, White Masks. Trans. Charles Lam Markmann. New York: Grove, 1967.
—. The Wretched of the Earth. Trans. Constance Farrington. New York: Grove, 1963.
Freire, Paulo. Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Trans. Myra Bergman Ramos. New York: Continuum, 1993.
Gilyard, Keith. “African American Contributions to Composition Studies.” CCC 50.4 (1999): 626-44.
Gold, David. ” ‘Nothing Educates Us Like a Shock’: The Integrated Rhetoric of Melvin B. Tolson .” CCC 55.2 (2003): 226- 53.
Gramsci, Antonio. Selections from the Prison Notebooks. Ed. and Trans. Quintin Hoare and Geoffrey Nowell Smith. New York: International Publishers, 1971.
Hardin, Joe Marshall. Opening Spaces: Critical Pedagogy and Resistance Theory in Composition . Albany: State U of New York P, 2001.
Hollis, Karyn. Liberating Voices: Writing at the Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women Workers . Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2004.
Jacobs, Paul, and Saul Landau. The New Radicals: A Report with Documents . New York: Random House, 1966.
Jefferson, Pat. “‘Stokely’s Cool’: Style.” Today’s Speech 16.3 (1968): 19-24.
Kates, Susan. Activist Rhetorics and American Higher Education, 18851937. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2001.
Morgan, Marcyliena. Language, Discourse and Power in African American Culture . Studies in the Social and Cultural Foundations of Language 20. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2002.
Moses, Robert,and Charles E. Cobb, Jr.. Radical Equations: Math Literacy and Civil Rights . Boston: Beacon Press, 2001.
Parks, Stephen. Class Politics: The Movement for the Students’ Right to Their Own Language . Urbana: NCTE, 2000.
Richardson, Elaine. African American Literacies. London: Routledge, 2003.
Robinson, Larry. “Stokely Carmichael: Jazz Artist.” Western Speech 34 (1970): 212- 218.
Smitherman, Geneva. “Black Power Is Black Language.” Black Culture: Reading and Writing Black . ed. Gloria M. Simmons and Helene Hutchinson. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1972.
—. Talkin that Talk: Language, Culture and Education in America. New York: Routledge, 1999.
Ture, Kwame, and Charles V. Hamilton. Black Power: The Politics of Liberation . New York: Vintage Books, 1992.
“Which Way for the Negro?” Newsweek. May 15, 1967: 27-34.
Williams, Raymond. Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society. Rev. ed. New York: Oxford UP, 1983.
Zinn, Howard. SNCC: The New Abolitionists. Westport: Greenwood, 1985.

Reyman, Jessica. “Copyright, Distance Education, and the TEACH Act: Implications for Teaching Writing.” CCC 58.1 (2006): 30-45.

Abstract:

The Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization (TEACH) Act of 2002 was developed to update copyright law to accommodate the uses of copyrighted materials in distance-education environments. This article presents an analysis of the TEACH Act and its implications for teaching writing, with an aim toward building awareness among faculty and administrators so that they can become part of the critical conversation about copyright law as it affects teaching and learning with technology.

Keywords:

ccc58.1 Copyright Materials Use Law Students Writing Education Rights Online Technology Owners TEACH DistanceEducation FairUse

Works Cited

Bell, Tom W. “Fair Use v. Fared Use: The Impact of Automated Rights Management on Copyright’s Fair Use Doctrine.” North Carolina Law Review. 76 (1998): 557-619.
Bolter, Jay David. Writing Space: Computers, Hypertext, and the Remediation of Print. 2nd ed. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2001.
Buranen, Lise, and Alice M. Roy, eds. Perspectives on Plagiarism and Intellectual Property in a Postmodern World. New York: SUNY, 1999.
Burk, Dan L. and Julie E. Cohen. “Fair Use Infrastructure for Rights Management Systems.” Harvard Journal of Law and Technology. 15.1 (2001): 41-83.
Bruffee, Kenneth A. “Collaborative Learning and the ‘Conversation of Mankind.'” College English 46.7 (1984): 635-652.
Carnevale, Dan. “Slow Start for Long- Awaited Easing of Copyright Restrictions.” Chronicle of Higher Education 28 March 2003: A29.
CCCC Caucus on Intellectual Property. “Use Your Fair Use: Strategies toward Action.” CCC 51.3: (2000). 485-88.
Copyright, Plagiarism, and Intellectual Property. Spec. issue of Kairos: A Journal for Teachers of Writing in Webbed Environments . 3.1 (1998). 3 Jan. 2006. http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/3.1/.
Crews, Kenneth D. “New Copyright Law for Distance Education: The Meaning and Importance of the TEACH Act.” 30 Sept. 2002. American Library Association. 25 Aug. 2003. http://web.archive.org/web/20021127113330 or http://www.ala.org/washoff/teach.html.
Foster, Andrea L. “College Media Group Cautions That 2 Copyright Laws Could Collide.” Chronicle of Higher Education 18 March 2003. 3 Jan. 2006 http://chronicle.com/free/2003/03/2003031801t.htm.
Gasaway, Laura N. “Impasse: Distance Learning and Copyright.” Ohio State Law Journal . 62 (2001): 783-820.
—. TEACH Act Comparison Chart. 2002. 27 May 2005 http://www.unc.edu/~unclng/TEACH.htm.
Gurak, Laura J., and Johndan Johnson- Eilola, eds. Computers, Composition, and Intellectual Property . Spec. issue of Computers and Composition . 15.2 (1998).
Herrington, TyAnna K. Controlling Voices: Intellectual Property, Humanistic Studies, and the Internet. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2001.
Howard, Rebecca Moore. Standing in the Shadow of Giants: Plagiarists, Authors, Collaborators. Stamford, CT: Ablex, 1999.
Landow, George P. Hypertext 2.0: The Convergence of Contemporary Critical Theory and Technology . 2nd ed. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1997.
LeFevre, Karen Burke. Invention as a Social Act. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1987.
Le Moal-Gray, Michele J. “Distance Education and Intellectual Property: The Realities of Copyright Law and the Culture of Higher Education.” Touro Law Review . 16 (2000): 981-1035.
Lessig, Lawrence. Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity . New York: Penguin, 2004.
Lipinski, Tomas A. “Legal Reform in an Electronic Age: Analysis and Critique of the Construction and Operation of S. 487, the Technology, Education and Copyright Harmonization (TEACH) Act of 2001.” Brigham Young University Education and Law Journal . 95 (2003): 95-164.
Lunsford, Andrea A., and Lisa Ede. Singular Texts/Plural Authors: Perspectives on Collaborative Writing. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1990.
Lunsford, Andrea A., and Susan West. ” Intellectual Property and Composition Studies .” CCC 47.3 (1996): 383-411.
Patterson, L. Ray, and Stanley W. Lindberg. The Nature of Copyright: A Law of Users’ Rights . Athens: U of Georgia P, 1991.
Silberberg, Carol M. “Preserving Educational Fair Use in the Twenty-First Century.” Southern California Law Review. 74 (2001): 617-655.
Spigelman, Candace. Across Property Lines: Textual Ownership in Writing Groups. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2000.
United States. Copyright Office. Report on Copyright and Digital Distance Education . Washington: U.S. Copyright Office, 1999. 27 May 2005 http://www.copyright.gov/reports/de_rprt.pdf.
—. House of Representatives. Statement by Marybeth Peters. The Register of Copyrights before the House Subcommittee on Courts, the Internet and Intellectual Property . 107th Cong., 1st sess. Washington: GPO, 2001. 27 May 2005 http://www.copyright.gov/docs/regstat062701.html.
—. Senate. Technology, Education and Copyright Harmonization Act of 2001 . 107th Cong., 1st sess. S. Rept. 107-031.
Washington: GPO, 2001. 3 Jan. 2006 http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/cpquery/R?cp107:FLD010:@1(sr031).
Vaidhyanathan, Siva. “Fair Use in (In)Action.” Blog posting. 7 Jul. 2004. Sivacracy.net. 27 May 2005 http://www.nyu.edu/classes/siva/2004/07/fair-use-ininaction.html.

Bizzell, Patricia. “Rationality as Rhetorical Strategy at the Barcelona Disputation, 1263: A Cautionary Tale.” CCC 58.1 (2006): 12-29.

Abstract:

Often, composition teachers present public debate as if it occurs on a rhetorically level playing field, with victory going to the person who argues most logically. Real-world contestants are seldom so equal in power. We can enrich our pedagogy by studying such encounters; example: the 1263 disputation at Barcelona between Rabbi Nachmanides and Friar Paul Christian.

Keywords:

ccc58.1 Jews Christians RabbiNahamanides FriarPaul Disputation Messiah Texts Barcelona History Rationality Power Debate Argument Faith

Works Cited

Abulafia, Anna Sapir. Christians and Jews in the Twelfth-Century Renaissance. London and New York: Routledge, 1995.
Bizzell, Patricia. “The Intellectual Work of ‘Mixed’ Forms of Academic Discourse.” In ALT DIS: Alternative Discourses and the Academy. Schroeder, Fox, Bizzell, eds. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann- Boynton/Cook, 2002.
—. ” The 4th of July and the 22nd of December: The Function of Cultural Archives in Persuasion as Shown by Frederick Douglass and William Apess .” College Composition and Communication 48 (February 1997): 44-60.
— and Bruce Herzberg. Negotiating Difference: Readings in Multicultural American Rhetoric. Boston: Bedford- St. Martin’s, 1995.
Chazan, Robert. Barcelona and Beyond: The Disputation of 1263 and Its Aftermath . Berkeley: U of California P, 1992.
Cohen, Mark R. Under Crescent and Cross: The Jews in the Middle Ages. Princeton: Princeton U P, 1995.
The Disputation: A Theological Debate between Christians and Jews. Dir. Geoffrey Sax. Perf. Alan Dobie, Bernard Hepton, Christopher Lee, Helen Lindsay, Bob Peck, Toyah Wilcox. Videocassette. Princeton Films for the Humanities, 1991.
Gerber, Jane. The Jews of Spain: A History of the Sephardic Experience. New York: Macmillan-Free Press, 1992.
Holdstein, Deborah H. “The Ironies of Ethos.” JAC 20 (Fall 2000): 942-948.
Hurwitz, Barbara Phyllis. Fidei Causa Et Tui Amore: The Role of Petrus Alphonsi’s Dialogues in the History of Jewish- Christian Debate . Diss. Yale University, 1983. Ann Arbor: UMI, 1985.
Lyons, Scott. “A Captivity Narrative: Indians, Mixedbloods, and the ‘White’ Academy.” In Outbursts in Academe: Multiculturalism and Other Sources of Conflict . Kathleen Dixon, ed. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann-Boynton/Cook, 1998.
Menocal, María Rosa. The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain. Boston: Little, Brown, 2002.
Ramban (Nahmanides). Writings and Discourses. Two volumes. Translated and index by Charles B. Chavel. New York: Shilo P, 1978.
Reilly, Bernard F. The Medieval Spains. Cambridge: Cambridge U P, 1993.
Schroeder, Christopher, Helen Fox, and Patricia Bizzell, eds. ALT DIS: Alternative Discourses and the Academy . Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann-Boynton/Cook, 2002.

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