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College Composition and Communication, Vol. 46, No. 1, February 1995

Click here to view the individual articles in this issue at http://www.ncte.org/cccc/ccc/issues/v46-1

Clark, Suzanne. “Women, Rhetoric, Teaching.” Rev. of Women Writing the Academy: Audience, Authority, and Transformation by Gesa E. Kirsch; An Ethic of Care: Feminist and Interdisciplinary Perspectives by Mary Jeanne Larrabee; Feminisms and Critical Pedagogy by Carmen Luke and Jennifer Gore; Feminine Principles and Women’s Experience in American Composition and Rhetoric by Louise Wetherbee Phelps and Janet Emig; Anxious Power: Reading, Writing, and Ambivalence in Narrative by Women by Carol J. Singley; Susan Elizabeth Sweeney. CCC 46.1 (1995): 108-122.

Bartholomae, David, et al. “Interchanges: Responses to Bartholomae and Elbow.” CCC 46.1 (1995): 84-107.

Elbow, Peter. “Being a Writer vs. Being an Academic: A Conflict in Goals.” CCC 46.1 (1995): 72-83.

Abstract:

This article is a published edition of Peter Elbow’s talk about the definitions and place of personal and academic writing given at the 1991 College Composition and Communication Conference in Boston, Massachusetts. Elbow advocates students be taught to be writers and academics; he defines the two in contradistinction to each other.

Keywords:

ccc46.1 Writers Students Writing Readers Academics Conflict Course Role Conversation DBartholomae Interests Texts

Bartholomae, David. “Writing with Teachers: A Conversation with Peter Elbow.” CCC 46.1 (1995): 62-71.

Abstract:

This article is a published edition of David Bartholomae’s talk about the definitions and place of personal and academic writing given at the 1991 College Composition and Communication Conference in Boston, Massachusetts. Bartholomae argues that academic writing is never “free” from institutional pressures and powers and that “free writing is the master trope” of such a fallacy.

Keywords:

ccc46.1 Writing Students AcademicWriting Classrooms Desire Power Work Argument PElbow Argument Conversation

Bridwell-Bowles, Lillian. “Freedom, Form, Function: Varieties of Academic Discourse,” CCC 46.1 (1995): 46-61.

Abstract:

Bridwell-Bowles calls teachers to teach writers not only academic discourse conventions but transformative language about complex politically charged subjects. Reviewing her own literacy history and recent composition history, she claims academic writing still needs the upset and complement of alternate writing: “writing that is not always about later, about jobs and careers, but writing that is about themselves as people, as individuals and citizens of various communities.”

Keywords:

ccc46.1 Writing Students Language World Discourse Form Dreams Education Profession Thinking Practices Literacy Freedom AcademicWriting

Works Cited

Baez, Joan. Baptism: A Journey through Our Time. Vanguard, VSD-79275, 1968.
Barber, Benjamin R. “Jihad vs. McWorld.” Atlantic, March 1992: 53-62.
Bizzell, Patricia, and Bruce Herzberg. The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present. Boston: Bedford, 1990.
Bloom, Allan. The Closing of the American Mind. New York: Simon, 1987.
Bridwell-Bowles, Lillian. “Discourse and Diversity: Experimental Writing Within the Academy.” CCC 43 (1992): 349-68.
Conley, Verena Andermatt. Helene Cixous: Writing the Feminine. 2nd Ed. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 1991.
Didion, Joan, Salvador. New York: Simon, 1983.
Foss, Sonja K., Karen A. Foss, and Robert Trapp. Contemporary Perspectives on Rhetoric. 2nd Ed. Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland, 1991.
Freire, Paulo. Pedagogy of the Oppressed:. Tr. Myra Bergman Ramos. New York: Seabury, 1970.
Gates, Henry Louis, Jr. Loose Canons: Notes on the Culture Wars. New York: Oxford UP, 1992.
Gere, Anne Ruggles. ” Kitchen Tables and Rented Rooms: The Extracurriculum of Composition .” CCC 45 (1994): 75-92.
Gilyard, Keith. Voices of the Self A Study of Language Competence. Detroit: Wayne State UP, 1991.
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Hairston, Maxine. “Breaking Our Bonds and Reaffirming Our Connections.” CCC 36 (1985): 272-282.
Harred, Jane. Never a Copy: The Conflicting Claims of Narrative Discourse and Its Referent in the Literary Journalism of Truman Capote, Hunter S. Thompson, and Joan Didion. Diss. U of Minnesota, 1994.
Harris, Joseph. ” The Idea of Community in the Study of Writing .” CCC 40 (1989): 11-22.
Hughes, Langston. “Dreams.” Reflections on a Gift of Watermelon Pickle. Ed. Stephen Dunning, Edward Lueders, and Hugh Smith. Glenview, IL: Scott, 1966. 129.
Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1978.
Kimball, Roger. Tenured Radicals: How Politics Has Corrupted Higher Education. New York: Harper, 1990.
Lloyd-Jones, Richard. “Who We Were, Who We Should Become.” CCC 43 (1992): 486-96.
Lunsford, Andrea A., and John J. Ruszkiewicz. The Presence of Others: Readings for Critical Thinking and Writing. New York: St. Martin’s, 1994.
Pilger, John. “Having Fun with Fear.” Rev. of Salvador by Joan Didion. New Statesman 6 (1983): 21.
Rich, Adrienne. On Lies, Secrets and Silences: Selected Prose 1966-78. New York, Norton, 1979.
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White, Edward M. “An Apologia for the Timed Impromptu Essay Test.” CCC 46.1 (1995): 30-45.

Abstract:

White calls that the college essay test be reevaluated with “attention to its virtues as well as its drawbacks.” He believes essay testing still plays a role in the development of portfolios and in the general arena of writing assessment. White particularly calls for a less reactive stance by the composition community against essay testing, noting that 70% of universities still use the form as a part of admissions and that colleagues outside the English Department might default to multiple-choice testing if no vigorously qualified standard of essay testing is recommended.

Keywords:

ccc46.1 Essay Writing Test Assessment Portfolios Testing Reliability Students Validity Students

Works Cited

Belanoff, Pat and Marcia Dickson. Portfolios: Process and Product. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton, 1991.
Black, Laurel. Donald A. Daiker, Jeffrey Sommers, and Gail Stygall. Handbook of Writing Portfolio Assessment: A Program for College Placement. Oxford, OH: Department of English, 1992.
Diederich, Paul. Measuring Growth in English. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1974.
Elbow, Peter. “Foreword.” Belanoff and Dickson ix-xvi.
Haswell, Richard H. Gaining Ground in College Writing: Tales of Development and Interpretation. Dallas, TX: Southern UP, 1991.
Koenig, Judith and Karen Mitchell. “An Interim Report on the MCAT Essay Pilot Project.” Journal of Medical Education 63 (1988): 21-29.
Koretz, Daniel. et al. The Reliability of Scores From the 1992 Vermont Portfolio Assessment Program. CSE Technical Report 355. Los Angeles: UCLA Center for the Study of Evaluation, 1993.
Mahala, Daniel, and Michael Vivion. “The Role of AP and the Composition Program.” WPA 17 (1993): 43-56.
Mitchell, Karen, and Judith Anderson. “Reliability of Essay Scoring for the MCAT Essay.” Educational and Psychological Measurement46 (1986): 771-75.
Murphy, Sandra, et al. “Survey of Postsecondary Writing Assessment Practices.” Report to the CCCC Executive Committee, 1993.
Roemer, Marjorie, Lucille M. Schultz, and Russell K. Durst. “Portfolios and the Process of Change.” CCC 42 (1991): 455-69.
White, Edward M. “Assessing Higher-Order Thinking and Communication Skills in College Graduates Through Writing.” Journal of General Education 42 (1993): 105-22.
—. “Holistic Scoring: Past Triumphs, Future Challenges.” Williamson and Huot 79-106.
—. Teaching and Assessing Writing. 2nd ed. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1994.
White, Edward M. and Leon 1. Thomas. “Racial Minorities and Writing Skills Assessment in The California State University and Colleges.” College English 42 (1981): 276-283.
Williamson, Michael M. and Brian A. Huot. Validating Holistic Scoring for Writing Assessment: Theoretical and Empirical Foundations. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton, 1993.

Kirsch, Gesa E. and Joy S. Ritchie. “Beyond the Personal: Theorizing a Politics of Location in Composition Research.” CCC 46.1 (1995): 7-29.

Abstract:

Given that feminist scholarship has informed composition studies and admitted the personal into public discourse, how might its emphasis on fronting personal, material politics of location inform and change research practices? Ritchie and Kirsch argue that it is not enough to claim the personal and locate oneself in one’s scholarship but that they also theorize their locations by “examining their experiences as reflections of ideology and culture, by interpreting their experiences through the eyes of others, and by recognizing their own split selves.” The authors further recommend changes in research practices that emphasize collaboration with participants, the writing of research reports and the raising of ethical questions relative to these research practices.

Keywords:

ccc46.1 Research Researchers Women Questions Composition Location Writing Politics Experience Feminism Scholars Work Personal Gender Ethics

Works Cited

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Alcoff, Linda. “The Problem of Speaking for Others.” Cultural Critique 20 (1991-92): 5-32.
Anderson, Worth, Cynthia Best, Alycia Black. John Hurst, Brandt Miller, and Susan Miller. ” Cross-Curricular Ablex: A Collaborative Report on Ways with Academic Words .” CCC 41 (1990): 11-36.
Bizzell, Patricia. “Foundationalism and Anti­Foundationalism in Composition Studies.” Pre/Text 7 (1986): 37-56.
Bridwell-Bowles, Lillian. “Discourse and Diversity: Experimental Writing Within the Academy.” CCC 43 (1992): 349-68.
Card, Claudia, ed. Feminist Ethics. Lawrence: UP of Kansas. 1991.
Clark, Beverly Lyon, and Sonja Wiedenhaupt. “On Blocking and Unblocking Sonja: A Case Study in Two Voices.” CCC 43 (1992): 55-74.
Clark, Gregory. “Rescuing the Discourse of Community.” CCC 45 (1994): 61-74.
Collins, Patricia Hill. “Learning from the Outsider Within: The Sociological Significance of Black Feminist Thought.” (En)Gendering Knowledge: Feminists in Academe. Ed. Joan Hartman and Ellen Messer Davidow. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P, 1991. 40-65.
Deletiner, Carole. “Crossing Lines.” College English 54 (1992): 809-17.
Ebert, Teresa. “The ‘Difference’ of Postmodern Feminism.” College English 53 (1991): 886-904.
Eichhorn, Jill, Sara Farris, Karen Hayes, Adriana Hernandez, Susan Jarratt, Karen Powers-Stubbs, and Marian Sciachitano. “A Symposium on Feminist Experiences in the Composition Classroom.” CCC 43 (1992): 297-322.
Fine, Michelle. “Working the Hyphens: Reinventing Self and Other in Qualitative Research.” Handbook of Qualitative Research. Ed. Norman Denzin and Yvonna Lincoln. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1994. 70-82.
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—. Disputed Subjects: Essays on Psychoanalysis, Politics, and Philosophy. New York: Routledge, 1993.
Fonow, Mary, M. and Judith Cook, eds. Beyond Methodology: Feminist Scholarship as Lived Research. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1991.
Friedman, Marilyn. “Beyond Caring: The De-Moralization of Gender.” Science, Morality, and Feminist Theory. Ed. Marsha Hanen and Kai Nielsen. Calgary: U of Calgary P, 1987. 87-110.
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