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CCCC Emergent Researcher Awards

2018-2019 Call for Proposals

As teachers and scholars within the discipline and within CCCC undertake increasingly complex research projects, the nature of grant applications submitted to CCCC for research funding has changed. A greater number are submitted each year. But more important, the quality of these applications has improved considerably and the types of projects for which funding is being sought are more diverse. As an organization, CCCC is committed to supporting the diversity of applicants, projects, and research strategies included in these awards.

The CCCC Emergent Researcher Awards reflect this commitment and are intended to invest in our organization’s members by rewarding and supporting one or more of the following:

  • early career researchers
  • writing faculty/instructors who have not had the opportunity to engage in funded research
  • writing faculty/instructors who do not have support for research within their institutions

Only researchers who have not received previous funding from CCCC for research are eligible to apply for these awards. In addition to research funding, the Emergent Researcher Awards provide research support. All selected recipients (or recipient teams) will be matched with research mentors on their projects. These established scholars will have a successful record of mentoring and publication experience. The procedures through which mentors and emerging researchers collaborate will be determined by each pairing. However, the expectation is that the mentor will be available to consult with the researcher(s) at each stage of selected projects on issues ranging from design to methodology, writing to circulation.

Application Procedures

As with the CCCC Research Initiative, the Emergent Researcher Awards are intended to contribute to CCCC’s efforts for the organization and its members to become a clear, trusted public voice on issues of writing and writing instruction. To this end, we invite proposals for projects that can contribute to or affect discussions about literacy and writing instruction in and out of formal education. The initiative also asks recipients to clearly address the impact their research might have on these conversations, conveying the implications of their work in at least two final products: one that is addressed to a scholarly audience of researchers and teachers in the field, and one that is addressed to a specifically identified more public audience.

Particular topics and areas of interest include but are not limited to the broad areas outlined below:

  • Research that produces knowledge about language, literacy, communication, rhetoric, and the teaching, assessment, and technologies of writing at the post-secondary level
  • Writing in organizations, communities, and/or cultures
  • Transfer of writing ability across contexts
  • Disciplinarity of writing studies/composition, including
    • critical praxis of the discipline’s growth
    • development of teachers or researchers
    • professionalization or mentoring of undergraduate or graduate students joining the discipline
  • Historiography
  • Assessment of writing and literacy
    • assessment practices, including development of and/or alternatives to outcomes
    • innovative assessment design
  • Development of writers or writing abilities among different groups
    • secondary-postsecondary transitions
    • “basic” writers
    • multilingual writers
  • Material and working conditions for writing instruction and their influence on teaching and learning

We invite proposals for research that employ diverse perspectives and methodologies, including historical, archival, rhetorical, qualitative, quantitative, ethnographic, and textual.

Proposals should include:

  1. a cover page that contains the title of the proposal, the names and full contact information of the investigator(s) (institution, address, phone, email), and, in the event of multiple investigators, the designation of a principal contact (maximum: 1 page).
     
  2. a narrative of no more than 5 single-spaced pages (12-point font, 1-inch margins) that:
    a. describes how the proposer(s) fulfills the criteria of emergent researcher(s);
    b. defines the project and articulates specific research questions;
    c. explains the significance of the project and identifies the gaps in knowledge it seeks to fill;
    d. situates the project in relevant scholarly conversations about the subject to be studied;
    e. carefully describes the proposed methodology and methods;
    f. underscores how and why the research is relevant to writing instructors and/or researchers;
    g. describes the personnel and financial resources needed to complete the project, arguing why they are necessary and relevant; and
    h. describes what the project will add to existing conversations among academic and public audiences and identifies at least two final products – one that is addressed to a scholarly audience of researchers and teachers in the field and one that is addressed to a specifically identified more public audience. Academic products should be submitted to CCCC or NCTE publications (e.g., CCC, Studies in Writing and Rhetoric) for first review, prior to submission to other publications (though receipt does not guarantee acceptance by CCC or Studies in Writing and Rhetoric).

    In addition to introducing the review committee to your proposed research, your narrative will guide the identification of potential mentors so the proposal may explicitly address mentoring the emergent researcher hopes to receive, including any questions/concerns you have about the project.
     

  3. a 1-page description of the credentials the investigator(s) brings to the project (relevant details about positions and teaching/research experience is sufficient) (maximum: 1 page).
     
  4. a detailed budget with specific rationale for all expenses. Funds may be used for direct costs associated with the research, such as reassigned time/course buyout, student assistance, software, stipends for research subjects, etc. If student assistance is included in the budget, proposals should explain how the assistance will provide a learning/mentoring opportunity for the students involved. Please note that this grant may not be used to pay overhead, indirect costs, or travel to the CCCC Convention. Equipment costs are allowable if justified (maximum: 1 page).

Maximum proposal length, including all components described above, is 8 pages.

CCCC plans to fund proposals of up to $10,000 each. The principal investigator(s) must belong to CCCC at the time of proposal submission. Proposed projects are expected to last up to two years but can run for shorter periods of time. Proposals are to be submitted no later than 11:59 p.m. CDT on September 1, 2018, as a single email attachment to the CCCC Liaison at cccc@ncte.org. Proposals are reviewed by a joint committee comprising CCCC Executive Committee members and members selected from the CCCC Research Committee. Decisions will be announced by January 30, 2019. A mid-project report will be due by March 1, 2020. (This will be the final report date for projects lasting up to one year.) Projects should be completed and a final report submitted by March 1, 2021, for projects lasting two years. A summary version of the final report will be hosted on the CCCC website.

Eligibility

Researchers may submit only one research proposal per award cycle for either the CCCC Research Initiative or the CCCC Emergent Researcher Award—researchers cannot submit to both. Additionally, CCCC research grant recipients may not apply for CCCC research funding in the 3 years following the initial grant year (e.g., if the initial funding term begins in 2019, researchers may not apply again until the 2022 award cycle).

Emergent Research/er Award Recipients

2017-2018

Early 20th Century Women Physicians Use of Print-Based Social Media: A Digital Humanities Study of the Women’s Medical Journal
Patricia Fancher, University of California Santa Barbara

Techno-Ecologies and Professional Development: Profiles from CCCC Certificate of Writing Excellence Awardees
Kerri Hauman, Transylvnia University, Alison Witte, Trine University, and Stacy Kastner, Brown University

Outsourced Writing: Transnational Literacy in the Conceptual Age
Eileen Lagman, University of Colorado Boulder

The Archive of Workplace Writing Experiences
Jessica McCaughey, The George Washington University and Brian Fitzpatrick, George Mason University

Archiving Class Identities: Re-circulating Transnational Working-Class Community Writing Through Augmented Reality
Jessica Pauszek, Texas A&M University

Archival Research in the Global South: International Feminist Historiography
Emily Petersen, Weber State University and Breeanne Matheson, Utah State University

Cross-Institutional Study of Communities of Inquiry in Blended and Online Composition
Mary Stewart, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Jennifer Cunningham, Kent State University at Stark, Lyra Hilliard, University of Maryland College Park, and Natalie Stillman-Webb, University of Utah

2016-2017

Intranationalism: Conceptualizing New Intersections Between US-Based Higher Education Models and Students in Middle East and North African Nations
James P. Austin, Fort Hays State University

Becoming an insider: Exploring the development of discursive identity in science by women of color in an undergraduate research program
Heather Falconer, Northeastern University

Remediating Culture: A Rhetorical History of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School
Sarah Klotz, Butte College

Toward Data-Driven Support for Graduate and Faculty Writers: Two Inter-Informative Research Studies
Shannon Madden, University of Rhode Island, and Sandra L. Tarabochia, University of Oklahoma

“Raising Hell”: African-American Literacy Instruction in the Jim Crow South
Sue Mendelsohn, Columbia University

Distant Readings of Disciplinarity: Knowing and Doing in Composition/Rhetoric Dissertations
Benjamin Miller, University of Pittsburgh

Reports of Agency: Retrieving Indigenous Professional Communication in Indian Bureau Agency Documents, 1902-1916
Julianne Newmark, University of New Mexico

Looking and Listening for Multiple Literacies and Transfer through Video in the Writing Classroom
Crystal VanKooten, Oakland University

Considering the Context: A Study of Early College and College in the High School Programs
Erin Wecker, The University of Montana, and Patricia Wilde, Washington State University, Tri-Cities

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