Conference on College Composition and Communication Logo

College Composition and Communication, Vol. 57, No. 2, December 2005

Click here to view the individual articles in this issue at http://www.ncte.org/cccc/ccc/issues/v57-2

Gilyard, Keith. “Review Essay: Language, Identity, and Citizenship.” Rev. of Black Identity: Rhetoric, Ideology and Nineteenth-Century Black Nationalism by Dexter B. Gordon; Literacy and Racial Justice: The Politics of Learning after Brown v. Board of Education by Catherine Prendergast; Latino/a Discourses: On Language, Identity and Literacy Education , Michelle Hall Kells, Valerie Balester, and Victor Villanueva, eds. CCC 57.2 (2005): 364-371.

Laurence, David and Kathleen Blake Yancey. “Interchanges: Is the English Department Disappearing?” CCC 57.2 (2005): 358-363.

Abstract:

This interchange between Laurence and Yancey centers on a claim that Yancey makes in her 2004 CCCC Chair’s Address. CCC Online is pleased to be able to provide here a PDF copy (approx. 4.7 MB) of that Address (“Made Not Only in Words: Composition in a New Key“).

Hesse, Douglas D. “Who Owns Writing?” CCC 57.2 (2005): 335-357.

Abstract:

Not available.

Video

Clicking on either of the images below will trigger the video of Douglas Hesse’s 2005 CCCC Chair’s Address. You will need a video player capable of viewing QuickTime movies in order to view it. Also, because of the length of the talk, the file size is correspondingly substantial (approx. 32 MB).

Keywords:

ccc57.2 ChairsAddress Writing Essay Students CCCC School Teachers Composition Discourse Aphasia CivicSphere

Works Cited

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Burleigh, H. T. Album of Negro Spirituals. 1917. Melville, NY: Belwin Mills, 1969.
CCCC. “CCCC Position Statement on Teaching, Learning, and Assessing Writing in Digital Environments.” 25 Feb. 2004. 15 Mar. 2005 http://legacy.ncte.org/groups/cccc/positions/115775.htm.
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Conley, David T. Understanding University Success: A Report from Standards for Success, a Project of the Association of American Universities and the Pew Charitable Trusts . Eugene, OR: Center for Educational Policy Research, 2003.
Gere, Anne Ruggles. “Public Opinion and Teaching Writing.” The Politics of Writing Instruction: Postsecondary. Ed. Richard Bullock and John Trimbur. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton, 1991. 263-75.
Hillocks, George. Research on Written Composition: New Directions for Teaching . New York: NCRE; Urbana, IL: ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Natl. Inst. of Educ., 1986.
Lakoff, George. Don’t Think of an Elephant: Know Your Values and Frame the Debate . White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green, 2004.
Lessig, Lawrence. “Lessig Blog.” 2 Mar. 2005 http://www.lessig.org/blog/.
Mullen, Dave. EssayGenerator.com. 20 Feb. 2005 http://radioworldwide.gospelcom.net/essaygenerator/.
National Commission on Writing for America’s Families, Schools, and Colleges. The Neglected “R:” The Need for a Writing Revolution. Princeton, NJ: College Entrance Examination Board, 2003.
—. Writing: A Ticket to Work . . . or a Ticket Out: A Survey of Business Leaders . Princeton, NJ: College Entrance Examination Board, 2004.
Pearson Knowledge Technologies. “Intelligent Essay Assessor.” 2005. 10 Mar. 2005 http://www.knowledgetechnologies.com/.
Starr, Paul. The Creation of the Media: Political Origins of Modern Communication . New York: Basic, 2004.
Trimbur, John. “Literacy and the Discourse of Crisis.” The Politics of Writing Instruction: Postsecondary . Ed. Richard Bullock and John Trimbur. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton, 1991. 277-95.
Yancey, Kathleen Blake. ” Made Not Only in Words: Composition in a New Key .” CCC 56 (Dec. 2004): 297-328.

Moskovitz, Cary and David Kellogg. “Primary Science Communication in the First-Year Writing Course.” CCC 57.2 (2005): 307-334.

Abstract:

Despite the widespread acceptance of many kinds of nonliterary texts for first-year writing courses, primary scientific communication (PSC) remains largely absent. Objections to including PSC, especially that it is not rhetorically appropriate or sufficiently rich, do not hold. We argue for including PSC and give some practical suggestions for developing courses and designing assignments using PSC.

Keywords:

ccc57.2 PSC FYC Students Texts Science Research Composition Pollen Reading Disciplines Literature

Works Cited

Bartholomae, David, and Anthony Petrosky . Ways of Reading : An Anthology for Writers . 7th ed. New York: Bedford, 2004.
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—. The Informed Writer: Using Sources in the Disciplines . 2nd ed. Boston: Houghton, 1985.
Beaufort, Anne. Writing in the Real World: Making the Transition from School to Work . New York: Teachers College P, 1999.
Behrens, Laurence, and Leonard J. Rosen. Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum . 7th ed. New York: Addison, 2000.
Berkenkotter, Carol, and Thomas N. Huckin. Genre Knowledge in Disciplinary Communication: Cognition/Culture/ Power . Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 1995.
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Graff, Gerald. Clueless in Academe: How Schooling Obscures the Life of the Mind. New Haven: Yale UP, 2003.
Halpern, Diane F., and Milton D. Hakel. “Applying the Science of Learning to the University and Beyond: Teaching for Long-Term Retention and Transfer.” Change 35.4 (2003): 36-41.
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McLeod, Susan, and Elaine Maimon. “Clearing the Air: WAC Myths and Realities.” College English 62.5 (2000): 573-83.
Mitchell, W. J. T. “The Photographic Essay: Four Case Studies.” Ways of Reading Words and Images. David Bartholomae and Anthony Petrosky. New York: Bedford, 2003. 332-74.
Monroe, Jonathan. “Writing and the Disciplines.” Peer Review 6.1 (Fall 2003): 4-7. 14 Dec. 2003 http://www.aacu.org/peerreview/pr-fa03/pr-fa03feature1.cfm.
Penrose, Ann M., and Steven B. Katz. Writing in the Sciences: Exploring Conventions of Scientific Discourse . 2nd ed. New York: Pearson, 2004.
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Shipka, Jody. “A Multimodal Task-Based Framework for Composing.” CCC 57.2 (2005): 277-306.

Abstract:

This essay presents a task-based multimodal framework for composing grounded in theories of multiple media and goal formation. By examining the way two students negotiated the complex communicative tasks presented them in class, the essay underscores the benefits associated with asking students to attend to the various motives, activities, tools, and environments that occasion, support, and complicate the production of academic as well as everyday texts.

Keywords:

ccc57.2 Students Work Goals Tasks Multimodal Media Production Motives Academic Texts

Works Cited

Bazerman, Charles, and David Russell, eds. Writing Selves, Writing Societies: Research from Activity Perspectives. Fort Collins, CO: WAC Clearinghouse, 2003. 14 Aug. 2005 http://wac.colostate.edu/books/selves_societies.
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Jewitt, Carey, and Gunther Kress. Introduction. Multimodal Literacy. Ed. Carey Jewitt and Gunther Kress. New York: Lang, 2003. 1-18.
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Kress, Gunther. “‘English at the Crossroads: Rethinking Curricula of Communication in the Context of the Turn to the Visual.” Passions, Pedagogies, and 21st Century Technologies. Ed. Gail E. Hawisher and Cynthia L. Selfe. Logan: Utah State UP, 1999. 66-88.
Latterell, Catherine G. “Reexperiencing the Ordinary: Mapping Technology’s Impact on Everyday Life.” Practice in Context: Situating the Work of Writing Teachers . Ed. Cindy Moore and Peggy O’Neill. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 2002. 12-21.
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Nelson, Jennie. ” Reading Classrooms as Text: Exploring Student Writers’ Interpretive Practices .” CCC 46.3 (Oct. 1995): 411-29.
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Trimbur, John. ” Composition and the Circulation of Writing .” CCC 52.2 (Dec. 2000): 188-219.
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Wysocki, Anne Frances. “Opening New Media to Writing: Openings and Justifications.” Writing New Media: Theory and Applications for Expanding the Teaching of Composition . Ed. Anne Frances Wysocki, Johndan Johnson- Eilola, Cynthia L. Selfe, and Geoffrey Sirc. Logan: Utah State UP, 2004. 1-41.
Yancey, Kathleen Blake. ” Made Not Only in Words: Composition in a New Key .” 2004 CCCC Chair’s Address. CCC 56.2 (Dec. 2004): 297-328.

Brent, Doug. “Reinventing WAC (Again): The First-Year Seminar and Academic Literacy.” CCC 57.2 (2005): 253-276.

Abstract:

Academically oriented first-year seminars can be good venues for teaching many of the concepts important to WAC programs, including extended engagement with a research topic and situated writing. A qualitative study of a first-year seminar program at the University of Calgary highlights faculty members’ and students’ responses.

Keywords:

ccc57.2 WAC Students Qualitative Research FYC Course University Faculty Pedagogy Content Disciplines AcademicLiteracy

Works Cited

Andersen, Catherine, John N. Gardner, Jodi Levine Laufgraben, and Randy L. Swing. Moving toward Excellence: Assessing and Institutionalizing First-Year Seminars. Teleconference Resource Packet . Columbia, SC: National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition, 2003.
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Boyer Commission on Educating Undergraduates in the Research University. Reinventing Undergraduate Education: A Blueprint for America’s Research Universities. State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1998. 12 Apr. 2005 http://naples.cc.sunysb.edu/Pres/boyer.nsf/.
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Fishman, Jenn, et al. “Performing Writing, Performing Literacy.” CCC 57.2 (2005): 224-252.

Abstract:

This essay reports on the first two years of the Stanford Study of Writing, a five-year longitudinal study aimed at describing as accurately as possible all the kinds of writing students perform during their college years. Based on an early finding about the importance students attach to their out-of-class or self-sponsored writing and subsequent interviews with study participants, we argue that student writing is increasingly linked to theories and practices of performance. To illustrate the complex relationships between early college writing and performance, we explore the work of two study participants who are also coauthors of this essay.

Companion Videos

Beth McGregor
(2.8 MB)
Mark Otuteye (1)
(2.4 MB)
Mark Otuteye (2)
(2.6 MB)
(Clicking on each of the images above launches the respective video.
You will need to run Windows Media Player to be able to display them.)

Keywords:

ccc57.2 Writing Performance Students College Audience Study Composition Literacy Longitudinal BraddockAward

Works Cited

Banks, William P. “CCCC 2003 Interactive Review.” Academic.Writing: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Writing Across the Curriculum . 2003. 15 Nov. 2004 http://wac.colostate.edu/aw/reviews/cccc2003/viewmessages.cfm?Forum=8&Topic=58.
Bartholomae, David. “Inventing the University.” When a Writer Can’t Write: Studies in Writer’s Block and Other Composing Process Problems. Ed. Mike Rose. New York: Guilford, 1985. 273-85.
Beaufort, Anne. Freshmen Writing and Beyond: Re-Conceptualizing the Design of Post-Secondary Writing Courses , forthcoming.
—. Writing in the Real World: Making the Transition from School to Work . New York: Teachers College P, 1999.
Burke, Kenneth. Language as Symbolic Action: Essays on Life, Literature, and Method. Berkeley: U of California P, 1966.
Carlson, Marvin. Performance: A Critical Introduction. London: Routledge, 1996.
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Emig, Janet A. The Composing Processes of Twelfth Graders . Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1971.
Gere, Anne Ruggles. ” Kitchen Tables and Rented Rooms: The Extracurriculum of Composition .” CCC 45.1 (Feb. 1994): 75-92.
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Heath, Shirley Brice, and Laura Smyth. ArtShow: Youth and Community Development, A Resource Guide . Washington, DC: Partners for Livable Communities, 1999.
Herrington, Anne J., and Marcia Curtis. Persons in Process: Four Stories of Writing and Personal Development in College . Urbana, IL: NCTE, 2000.
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Welch, Kathleen. The Contemporary Reception of Classical Rhetoric: Appropriations of Ancient Discourse . Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 1990.

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